U.S. marijuana smoking Mexican exports

U.S. marijuana production is growing like a weed.

About half of the states in the country have legalized recreational and/or medical marijuana, and more states, including good ol’ Georgia, are considering relaxing existing laws.

NPR tells us the increased demand is being met by high-tech U.S. farmers who are churning out so much marijuana it’s nipping prices in the kind bud.

In Mexico, U.S. efforts have allegedly resulted in a 30 percent drop in production in some areas.

“If the U.S. continues to legalize pot, they’ll run us into the ground,” said one Mexican weed grower, who said prices have dropped from $90 a kilogram (2.2 pounds) to $40 in just two or three years. “The day we get $20 a kilo, it will get to the point that we just won’t plant marijuana anymore,” said the farmer in Mexico.

NPR alleges that at one time, “virtually all the weed smoked in the States, from Acapulco Gold to Colombian Red” originated in Mexico, but I’m not sure that’s true. I had always assumed Georgia, Florida, California and other U.S. states grew some marijuana.

U.S. cannabis is three to four times more expensive than Mexican imports, but Americans clearly prefer homegrown, says the “senior cultivation editor” at High Times magazine.

Why? Because U.S. marijuana, often grown indoors under ideal conditions, is much stronger.

U.S. marijuana is so good, some of the most potent stuff is now being smuggled to Mexico and sold for top Yankee dollar.

Global demand is such that an entire country, Uruguay, is now trying to grow, harvest, distribute (and of course tax) the product itself.

The drug cartels, which control large areas of our southern neighbor, are now looking to manufacture more hard drugs, including meth, cocaine and heroin.

If America legalizes any of those I’m driving a VW van to Canada.

More news I stumbled across today:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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