Police officer broke rules by inheriting $2.7 million

Some office rules don’t make sense.

Do I really have to make a new pot of coffee if I take the last cup? Is the “mother’s room” really not designed for naps?

In New Hampshire, a state typically visited only by presidential candidates, a police officer violated department policy by inheriting $2.7 million.

Photo by a hungry ELISSA EUBANKS / AJC staff

Photo by a hungry ELISSA EUBANKS / AJC staff

The news article doesn’t bother to tell us Sgt. Goodwin’s first name, but the “young detective” is accused of being nice to an elderly woman and not rejecting her offer of making him the main beneficiary of her estate.

The 64-page report into the misdeed concludes Goodwin “violated a department policy on accepting gifts, while his superiors failed to act when his relationship with the late Geraldine Webber became known.”

The report said “Goodwin should have unequivocally and continually refused even the possibility” of becoming a millionaire.

As one might expect, Mrs. Webber’s family is not happy the estate is not staying in the family. A probate judge will determine whether Goodwin emotionally manipulated Webber, who was 93 when she died in 2012, and whether she was of sound mind when she made her decision.

Goodwin, who visited the home about three times a week, was referred to as “my love” in Webber’s personal planning calendar, according to court testimony. Goodwin said he had no memory of taking Webber out for drinks on Nov. 20, 2011, the day she designated him as her power of attorney, but both events are noted on Webber’s calendar.

Journalists are supposed to reject gifts too, else it might influence our coverage. Once, however, I was given a free sweet tea at Fellini’s in Decatur, located at 333 Commerce Drive and serving delicious pizza today until midnight. Tell them George sent you.

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